Lori R. Holyfield Attorney at Law

An Advocate Through Life's Transitions

APPEALING A COURT'S ORDER

Generally speaking, when a court rules in a family law matter, one or both of the parties will be unhappy with the result.  This is particularly true in cases where the parties have tried and failed to settle the case on their own because such parties often have expectations that are very far apart to begin with.

What can you do if you're unhappy with a court's order?  First of all, with the help of an attorney, you can file a special motion asking the court to reconsider ("alter or amend") its ruling.  This is the least expensive option, but it may not be very effective, since a judge who decided a case against you the first time is not very likely to do a complete 180 just because you request him or her to reconsider. 

If the ruling was inconsistent with Tennessee law or precedent, the ruling did not seem logical in light of the evidence presented, or you simply cannot live with the result and you really believe the judge was wrong, you can also file an appeal to ask the Court of Appeals to review the judge's decision.  Appeals are highly technical, and the rules and procedures of the Court of Appeals must be strictly followed.  For this reason, it is a bad idea for most people to attempt to represent themselves in the Court of Appeals.

You have a very limited time to file an appeal after the court makes its ruling, so it is imperative that you consult with an appellate attorney immediately if you think you might want to pursue an appeal.

Lori R. Holyfield focuses her practice in divorce and family law and serves Shelby, Tipton, and Fayette Counties in southwest Tennessee.

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Legal information posted or made available by Ms. Holyfield on or through this website is not intended as legal advice or to create an attorney-client relationship between any individual or entity and any attorney, including Ms. Holyfield. Such Legal Information is intended for general informational purposes only and should be used only as a starting point for addressing your legal issues. It is not a substitute for an in-person or telephone consultation with an attorney licensed to practice in your jurisdiction about your specific legal issue, and you should not rely upon such Legal Information.

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